PETA

PETA

A total of 202 cats were experimented on in 2012, Home Office Minister Norman Baker revealed.

The number has significantly risen from 153 in 2011 and 152 in 2010.

The cats were mainly used in the development of veterinary medicines and neurological research.

According to Baker, Home Office minister responsible for animal experiments, cats are given extra protection in the Animals Act 1986 and their use is only limited to when no other species is available or it is not practical to get another animal.

‘Much of the veterinary research is for the benefit of cats, for example in developing vaccines for feline diseases and improved diets for cats,’ said Baker while answering to MP Sir Greg Knight in parliament.

Animal welfare organizations have complaint for years about the secrecy surrounding animal experimentation in the UK.

Earlier this year, the UK government launched a public consultation to scrap Section 24, which has now closed and results are still awaited.

Section 24 of the Animals Act 1986 makes it illegal to publicly share what exactly is being done to animals inside laboratories.

“Section 24 not only allows animal experimenters to conduct their cruel procedures behind closed doors but also leads to wasteful studies which delay medical progress and actually endanger human lives,” PETA wrote on their website.

“It’s good news that the government has decided to review Section 24. Freedom of access to information is an essential part of the democratic process, allowing the public to be fully informed about the horrors of animal testing and enabling wider scientific and ethical scrutiny of animal testing procedures so that alternatives to animals can be considered.

“Approximately 11,000 animals are subjected to experiments in British laboratories every single day. These animals are poisoned, surgically mutilated, starved, “stressed”, infected with deadly diseases or electrocuted. At the end of the experiments, all of them die – alone and afraid.”

Some of the animals are tortured for insignificant research such as household products. You can write to Norman Baker and ask him to ban on animal testing for household products and their ingredients.

Related Posts